Women Beyond Borders - Roma and Adivasi women on the move in India and Romania


Presentation by Cristina Dragomir

Women are typically portrayed as remaining behind in the migration process, or following their male partners. This is a feminist project encompassing both photography and storytelling, which challenges these stereotypes and showcases stories of migration of women labeled as “Gypsy” in Romania and India portraying them as powerful, striving, defying political, social and physical limits.

 
       Cristina-Ioana Dragomir teaches at Columbia University, Institute for the Study of Human Rights and a consults with the United Nations. She previously served as an Assistant Professor of Political Science at SUNY Oswego, and was a Center for Advanced Study of India 2016-2018 Visiting Scholar at University of Pennsylvania. Additionally, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow at Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy. She is the recipient of several awards and fellowships including the 2007 Ted Robinson Memorial Award, Bucerius Ph.D. Fellowship “Settling in Motion,” and The Global Network Grant from Open Society Institute.

Employing a critical feminist perspective, her work navigates the fields of social justice, human rights, subaltern studies, immigration and citizenship. She received her Ph.D. from the New School for Social Research in Politics in 2014, where she wrote her dissertation titled “Making the American Immigrant Soldier: Inclusion and Resistance,” which examined the role played by gender, race, ethnicity and class in the integration of immigrants in the American military. Currently, using a transnational framework, she analyzes the processes employed by Roma and Adivasi communities to mobilize against racial and ethnic discrimination in Europe and India, and she describes the practices and processes these groups use to challenge the existing political and social order and strive to achieve parity. 


Cristina Dragomir received a scholarship of ZEIT-Stiftung Ebelin und Gerd Bucerius within the doctoral programme "Settling Into Motion", dealing with migration studies, in 2010-11.